Tag Archives: soup

Sweet potato soup with cumin and ginger

Sweet potato soup with cumin and ginger

Sweet potato soup with cumin an ginger is a great choice for any meal. Vibrant in colour and quick to make, this soup is ideal for any winter party. A root vegetable that resembles a potato, although it is quite different in taste and texture (and is not related to the potato). It has a pinkish-orange skin and a deep-orange, creamy-textured flesh that’s much lighter and fluffier than that of the potato. Sweet potatoes can be cooked in similar ways to the potato but cook much more quickly. Mixture of sweetness of the potatoes and subtle spicy taste of cumin and ginger makes this soup a great warming dish. Cumin seeds have a warm flavour and a strong, pungent aroma. Serve with croûtons or crispy bread, and garnish with some double cream and chopped chives.

Watercress soup

Watercress soup

Watercress soup is smooth and creamy: blended onion, potatoes, watercress, stock and milk, lightly flavoured with a bay leaf. Watercress is a member of the mustard family and has a distinctive peppery flavour that makes them natural bedfellows to strongly flavoured meats such as game. The leaves are most commonly served raw as a garnish to eggs or meat, or as part of a salad with orange segments. Many benefits from eating watercress are claimed, such as that it acts as a stimulant, a source of phytochemicals and antioxidants, a diuretic, an expectorant, and a digestive aid. It also appears to have antiangiogenic cancer-suppressing properties. Watercress is available all year round but is at its best from April until September. Watercress is highly perishable, so store it in a perforated bag in the fridge and eat it within a couple of days. Alternatively, treat it like a bunch of flowers and put in a glass of water in the fridge, covering the leaves with a plastic bag – it can last a little longer that way. Watercress soup is delicious served chilled in summer. After puréeing, pour the soup into a large bowl, then cover, cool and chill for at least 3 hours. Taste for seasoning before serving.

Ajo blanco

Ajo blanco

Another version of gazpacho, ajo blanco is a survivor of the medieval moorish cuisine of the Mediterranean. Your first encounter with this cool, silky smooth soup with pale-green grapes and crouton floating on the top will astonish and delight you. This is a chilled version of almond soup which is served with grape halves floating on it. Sherry vinegar is an important ingredient of this Spanish soup consumed by the Jewish sect. The soups are extremely nutritious and contain minerals, vitamins as well as the antioxidants, that can be obtained from raw almonds.

Leek and mushroom soup

Leek and mushroom soup

Leek and mushroom soup you would just love for its full and earthy flavours of leeks and exotic mushrooms. This easy-to-make soup provide a delightful start to a meal at any time of year. Try to find mushrooms with rich flavour, even better if you can mix several different types (shiitake, porcini, oysters, white mushrooms, chanterelle…) . There are many edible varieties of mushrooms, many of which are available at specialty shops, natural grocers, and from farmers markets. Serve hot with fresh or toasted bread. It goes very nice with garlic bread.

Spanish Gazpacho

Spanish Gazpacho

Traditional gazpacho originates from romantic Andalucia – that large, exotic southerly region of Spain which is home to such extensive Arabic influence. The chilled, raw soup was originally made by pounding bread and garlic with tomatoes, cucumber and peppers but, nowadays, your electric blender renders this effortless! Olive oil endows it with a smooth, creamy consistency and vinegar adds a refreshing tang – just what you need when life gets too hot to handle!

The spicy soup should be served in true Spanish style with small bowls of accompaniments – finely chopped peppers, cucumber, onion … even hard-boiled eggs and croutons, if you feel up to it! Guests will then sprinkle what appeals to them on the soup.