Tag Archives: Moroccan cuisine

Moroccan spiced lentils

Moroccan spiced lentils

Moroccan spiced lentils are nice, warm and hearty dish which smell and taste will teleport you straight to the north of the Africa. Most broad-bean soup sellers also offer these spicy lentils, ladled into bowls. When cooking green (also called brown) lentils, it is tempting to drainthem after the first stage of cooking as the liquid is muddy, but in doing so, precious B vitamins are lost. Lentils are so versatile, cheap and delicious. Try them in a healthy soup, in Indian dal, or to add extra texture to a pumpkin stew or rice dish.  Lentils do not need soaking before cooking. Some will hold their shape well when cooked; others will collapse once cooked, so you need to decide what kind of recipe you are using the lentils for. Lentils are high in protein and therefore a valuable part of a vegan or vegetarian diet.

Spicy prawns

Spicy prawns

This spicy prawns recipe comes from Morocco. M’hammar is one of the four basic flavour combinations of Moroccan cuisine, with its main ingredients being garlic, paprika and cumin. With the addition of chopped red chilli, this prawn dish is worthy rival to the popular garlic prawns. In this recipe the spice gives a flavour, not heat. Prawns are available either raw or cooked, in or out of their shells. Cold-water prawns (which are the smaller, more standard prawns) are usually peeled, cooked and frozen on board ships. The most sustainable sources are from the North East Arctic and Canada. Warm-water prawns, such as tiger and king prawns are farmed and it is best to choose those that are organic or from a certified fishery.

Pastilla

Pastilla

Many people make pastilla with pigeon but it is great to do it with the duck. Brik pastry is the correct one to use and can be bought ready-made from Moroccan shops, some French delis and food halls. You can also use filo pastry instead, but do be careful using filo this way as the pastilla can become greasy if you add too much butter. Pastilla is generally served as a starter at the beginning of special meals. It is a pie which combines sweet and salty flavours; a combination of crisp layers of the pastry, savory meat slow-cooked in broth and spices and shredded, and a crunchy layer of toasted and ground almonds, cinnamon, and sugar. In a round pizza pan, the first dough layer is added, and butter brushed onto it. The cook adds the sauce over the dough, and places two more sheets on top. It is then baked, sprinked with confectioner’s sugar and perhaps more cinnamon, and served.