Tag Archives: Indian cuisine

Lamb koftas in yogurt with cinnamon and chilli

Lamb koftas in yogurt with cinnamon and chilli

Lamb koftas are one of the classics of Indian cuisine, well adopted by Westerners around the world. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat—usually beef, chicken, lamb, or pork—mixed with spices and/or onions. In India, vegetarian varieties include koftas made from potato, calabash, paneer, or banana. In Europe, kofta is served as fast food as a type of kebab. Koftas in India are usually served cooked in a spicy curry/gravy and are eaten with boiled rice or a variety of Indian breads. In Bengal, a region of eastern India, koftas are made from prawns, fish, green bananas, cabbage or meat, such as minced goat meat. In Kashmir, mutton is often used in the preparation of koftas, as opposed to beef or lamb. These koftas make a very good first course or snack.

Pistachio kulfi

Pistachio kulfi

Pistachio kulfi is an Indian classic dessert.  Kulfi is a popular frozen dairy dessert from the Indian Subcontinent. It is often described as “traditional Indian Subcontinent ice cream”. It is popular throughout places such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Burma (Myanmar), and the Middle East, and widely available in Indian restaurants in Australia, Europe, East Asia and North America. Kulfi is traditionally prepared by evaporating sweetened and flavoured milk via slow cooking, with almost continuous stirring to keep milk from sticking to the bottom of the vessel where it might burn, until its volume was reduced by a half, thus thickening it, increasing its fat, protein, and lactose density. It has a distinctive taste due to caramelization of lactose and sugar during the lengthy cooking process. Traditionally in India, kulfi is sold by vendors called kulfiwalas, who keep the kulfi frozen by placing the moulds inside a large earthenware pot called a matka, filled with ice and salt. It is served on a leaf or frozen onto a stick. It can be garnished with pistachios, cardamom, and similar items. Often it is served as falooda kulfi, which is kulfi with rice noodles, rose, or any flavour sugar syrup and other ingredients. Popular flavours include pistachio, mango, vanilla, and rose.

Saag aloo

Saag aloo

Saag aloo  is a North Indian dish made from spinach (saag) and potato (aloo) that has a uniquely delicious taste. It is perhaps one of the most popular Indian side dishes in the UK. It is ideal eaten with rice, lentil dal and another vegetable, meat or fish main course. You can also serve your saag aloo with the plain naan bread. Seasoned with black mustard seeds, grated ginger and turmeric, this dish will have your taste buds dancing all over the place. Double your portions and make a large batch of this delicious recipe as a vegetarian curry for 4 or more people. Saag aloo is basically fried potatoes dipped in spinach curry, and can be made with both spinach and mustard leaves, although spinach is more common. Saag aloo is commonly served hot, and topped with ghee (clarified butter).

Matar paneer

Matar paneer

Matar paneer is a popular North Indian dish. Paneer is a firm Indian cheese, made by curdling hot milk with lemon juice or vinegar, then straining through muslin, rinsing off in water and pressing into rectangular blocks. It has the unusual properties of being suitable for frying and it does not melt when cooked, but stays in soft, neat little chunks. The use of paneer is more common in Nepal, India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh due to the prominence of milk in their cuisine. It is sometimes wrapped in dough and deep-fried or served with either spinach (palak paneer) or peas (mattar paneer). Matar paneer is usually served with naan, roti, chapati and paratha but goes very well with rice and pulao also. The mild flavors of the paneer (cottage cheese) marry beautifully with the delicious sauce in this recipe.