Tag Archives: dishes

Linguine with rocket

Linguine with rocket

Linguine with rocket can be a very nice, fashionable lunch, that is so quick and easy to make at home. Rocket has an excellent peppery flavour that combines beautifully with the Parmesan cheese. Linguine is an egg pasta and looks rather like flattened strands of spaghetti. Spaghetti, fettucine or pappardelle could be used instead. Dried pasta cooks in 10-12 minutes, but an even faster result can be obtained by using fresh pasta. Simply add it to a large pan of boiling, lightly salted water, making sure that all the strands are fully submerged, and cook for 2-3 minutes. The pasta is ready when it rises to the top of the pan and is tender to the taste, with a slight firmness in the centre. Fresh Parmesan keeps well in the refrigerator for up to a month, if wrapped in greaseproof paper.

Lamb koftas in yogurt with cinnamon and chilli

Lamb koftas in yogurt with cinnamon and chilli

Lamb koftas are one of the classics of Indian cuisine, well adopted by Westerners around the world. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat—usually beef, chicken, lamb, or pork—mixed with spices and/or onions. In India, vegetarian varieties include koftas made from potato, calabash, paneer, or banana. In Europe, kofta is served as fast food as a type of kebab. Koftas in India are usually served cooked in a spicy curry/gravy and are eaten with boiled rice or a variety of Indian breads. In Bengal, a region of eastern India, koftas are made from prawns, fish, green bananas, cabbage or meat, such as minced goat meat. In Kashmir, mutton is often used in the preparation of koftas, as opposed to beef or lamb. These koftas make a very good first course or snack.

Potato and cabbage bake

Potato and cabbage bake

A lovely combination of potatoes, cabbage and the Alpine cow’s cheese, Taleggio. Simple to prepare, and delicious eaten as a side dish with meat, or even on its own. Although cabbage is grown all over Italy it has always been a staple of the northern regions, providing nourishment in times of hardship. Despite its somewhat underrated reputation, people have alwalys loved cabbage and it has really evolved in Italian cooking over the years. There are different types: verza (Savoy), cappuccio (white), rosso (red) and cavoto nero (black). Savoy cabbage is probably the most used in Italian cooking: in soups, braised with pancetta, or stuffed. Waite cabbage is used to fill ravioli, in salads and can. be braised. Red cabbage is really only known in the north-east of Italy and cooked in local dishes with a Germanic influence. The ‘trend’ cavoio nero, grown mainly in Tuscany, is similar in taste to Savoy and can be used in much the same way.

Sweet potato soup with cumin and ginger

Sweet potato soup with cumin and ginger

Sweet potato soup with cumin an ginger is a great choice for any meal. Vibrant in colour and quick to make, this soup is ideal for any winter party. A root vegetable that resembles a potato, although it is quite different in taste and texture (and is not related to the potato). It has a pinkish-orange skin and a deep-orange, creamy-textured flesh that’s much lighter and fluffier than that of the potato. Sweet potatoes can be cooked in similar ways to the potato but cook much more quickly. Mixture of sweetness of the potatoes and subtle spicy taste of cumin and ginger makes this soup a great warming dish. Cumin seeds have a warm flavour and a strong, pungent aroma. Serve with croûtons or crispy bread, and garnish with some double cream and chopped chives.

Coronation chicken

Coronation chicken

Coronation chicken is an absolute must on any buffet. It is a combination of precooked cold chicken meat, raisins, herbs and spices, and a creamy mayonnaise-based sauce which can be eaten as a salad or used to fill sandwiches.The bright yellow colour of coronation chicken is usually coming from a curry powder or paste, although more sophisticated versions of the recipe are made using fresh herbs and spices and additional ingredients such as flaked almonds, raisins, and crème fraîche. The original dish used curry powder, as fresh curry spices were almost unobtainable in post-war Britain. Coronation chicken may have been inspired by jubilee chicken, a dish prepared for the silver jubilee of George V in 1935, which mixed chicken with mayonnaise and curry. Preparing the food for the banquet of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, Constance Spry, a food writer, and Rosemary Hume, a chef, created the recipe of cold chicken, curry cream sauce and dressing that would later become known as coronation chicken. Additionally, for the Queen’s Golden Jubilee in 2002, another celebratory dish was devised, also called Jubilee chicken.