Category Archives: SAUCES, DIPS AND PRESERVES

Chicken liver pâté

Chicken liver pâté

Chicken liver pâté is delicious and easy to make, great to simply spread onto a bread, fresh or toasted, or crackers. Unlike many of the pâtés we make that require a weighted terrine in a water bath, this one is relatively easy. You just trim the chicken livers of their connective tissue, sauté them in butter with shallots, garlic, and capers, add a little brandy, and then purée with cream and a little more butter. It’s best serve chilled, and because of its richness, a little goes a long way.

Pickled cabbage

Pickled cabbage

Pickled cabbage is favourite winter salad in some countries. It goes perfectly with meat, baked or mashed potatoes. Also could be base for stew-type dishes with sausages. Pickled cabbage or “Sauerkraut”, is finely cut cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria. It has a long shelf-life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage. Health benefits have been claimed for raw sauerkraut. It contains vitamin C, lactobacilli, and other nutrients. However, the low pH and abundance of lactobacilli may upset the intestines of people who are not used to eating acidic foods.

Mint chutney

Mint chutney

Mint chutney is a spicy dip made from mint leaves. It is an extremely flavorful condiment, and is served in small quantities. It is one of the most popular Indian chutneys around, as it can be served with almost any food. This chutney is not sweet, like tamarind or mango chutney. You can add sugar, if you like, though it is not traditional. Mint chutney it’s fresh and earthy with a slightly floral taste. This is versatile chutney and can be used as a condiment, dip or even as a spread. Be it samosas, pakoras, bhajjis or the luscious kebabs, fresh mint chutney is the perfect accompaniment to any Indian meal. Mint Chutney goes particularly well with non-vegetarian dishes such as Tandoori dishes, tikkas and kebabs. When buying fresh mint, look for bright green sturdy stems and leaves with a characteristic mint fragrance.

Easy homemade peanut butter

Easy homemade peanut butter

Early forms of peanut butter, like the Aztecs’ version, were nothing but pure roasted peanut paste. It may have been harder to work with and spread than regular peanut butter, less creamy and less sweet. Vegetable oil was also later added to most brands to aid in its spreadability, but with new modern processing machines being invented, the peanut butter was already significantly smoother than it had been. Peanut butter gives you some fiber, some vitamins and minerals (including potassium), and other nutrients. Unsalted peanut butter has a terrific potassium-to-sodium ratio, which counters the harmful cardiovascular effects of sodium surplus. And even salted peanut butter still has about twice as much potassium as sodium. Peanut butter also contains saturated fat and sodium.

Fejioa and passion fruit jam

Fejioa and passion fruit jam

Feijoa (also known as pineapple guavas and guavasteen) is an exotic fruit native to South America. Small, green and egg-shaped, the scent and flavour sometimes defy description. Pineapple, banana, mint, strawberry and guava flavours all mingle to create a taste sensation that is wonderfully addictive. The feijoa fruit is usually eaten by cutting it in half, then scooping out the pulp with a spoon. The fruits have a juicy sweet seed pulp, and slightly gritty flesh nearer the skin. The flavour is aromatic and sweet. If the utensils needed to eat it this way are not available, the feijoa can be torn or bitten in half, and the contents squeezed out and consumed. Fruit maturity is not always apparent from the outside as the fruits remain green until they are overmature or rotting. When the fruits are immature the seed pulp is white and opaque, becoming clear and jelly-like when ripe. Feijoa fruits are at their optimum maturity when the seed pulp has turned into a clear jelly with no hint of browning. Once the seed pulp and surrounding flesh start to brown, the fruit is over mature and should not be eaten.