Category Archives: SALADS

Quinoa salad

Quinoa salad

Quinoa is an airy grain that cooks up quickly like couscous, but with just the slightest bit of crunch.  Dating back to the Incas, this grain is still grown in Bolivia and Peru. The small round grains look similar to millet but are pale brown in colour. The taste is mild, and the texture firm and slightly chewy. When cooked, the grains sweeten and become translucent, ringed with white. Quinoa can be cooked like millet; it absorbs twice its volume in liquid. Use it in place of rice in cooked dishes, or serve it as a side dish, in salads or as a stuffing. Alternatively, try it as a substitute for porridge, served hot with cream, dried fruit and brown sugar.You’ll want to cook up extra so you can enjoy it for lunch the next day too!

Brussels sprouts with bacon and herbs

Brussels sprouts with bacon and herbs

Unlike the more standard roasting or steaming of brussels sprouts, this recipe utilizes the braising technique.  They are browned in a little butter and oil and then slowly simmered with some good chicken stock (or turkey stock if it’s on hand this time of year).  Combined with some bacon (always a good friend of a green vegetable), some shallots, and a few herbs, these edible buds are fork tender and quite possibly capable of winning over a few of those curled up noses at the table.

Aubergine with capers and mint

Aubergine with capers and mint

Aubergines can be bought all year round but they are at their best, not to mention cheapest, from July to September. Look for unblemished, firm, lustrous skin with a bright green calyx, or stem. In the past, many recipes recommended salting aubergines to reduce their bitter flavour. This isn’t really necessary now, although salting does make them absorb less oil when they’re fried. To prepare, wash the skin and trim off the stalk. Slice or cut the flesh into chunks just before cooking as it discolours quickly. Aubergines store well in the fridge or a cool larder for about four to six days. Aubergine with capers and mint is very easy to made and it can be served with meat and a nice glass of wine. 

Warm goat cheese and fruit salad

Warm goat cheese and fruit salad

This warm goat cheese and fruit salad is very tasty with a slice of toasted or fresh, warm bread. It is really juicy and makes a very good dish as itself. Cheeses are made from goats’ milk in every country where the animals are farmed, but usually this is on a small, domestic scale. France produces by far the largest range of commercial examples, from young, soft cheeses suitable for use in desserts to tangy, aged varieties that can be grated like parmesan. Goats’ cheeses should always be white on the inside, with none of the yellowness common to cows’ milk cheeses. If you’re worried about the pungent flavour that some goats’ cheeses can have, look for young, soft, creamy curd cheeses instead. Due to the number of varieties, goats’ cheese is available year-round, but some, such as Banon from South East France, are best in the summer.

Marrocan carrot and orange salad

Marrocan carrot and orange salad

Marrocan carrot and orange salad is very light, juicy and healthy dish. Also it is a good meal for children – they just love it! This salad can be served as light supper or healthy snack, alone or with toast and neutral light cream cheese. Choose firm carrots and avoid those that are flabby with wilted green tops. Go for small carrots if you can, as they are more tender than large one. Smaller or organic carrots only require topping and tailing and a quick scrub.