Category Archives: SALADS

Pasta with swordfish, aubergine and mint

Pasta with swordfish, aubergine and mint

Pasta with swordfish, aubergine and mint is very distinctive in taste and quite fulfilling. The swordfish is a firm, succulent and meaty fish whose texture can be compared to that of tuna. Swordfish is a bill fish with a deep iron-grey skin, slim body and long ‘sword’ or bill as the upper jaw. Available as steaks both fresh and frozen, although fresh swordfish is usually better. Swordfish is most often filleted or boned into loins at point of landing; the loins are usually cut into steaks and sold with skin already off, as it needs to be removed prior to cooking. Best char-grilled, pan-fried or barbecued, swordfish stands up well to strong flavours including chilli, ginger, sesame, soy, nam pla and garlic. Although it is an oil-rich species of fish, it benefits from being marinated or brushed generously with oil prior to cooking as this helps prevent it from drying out during cooking.When making this dish you can use busiate (traditional pasta from Trapani area), but this sauce works well with any pasta you have.

Greek Barley Salad

Greek Barley Salad

Greek barley salad is so delicious and full of many beautiful things – feta, grape tomatoes, basil, onions, pine nuts, lemon, and olives. This salad is high in fiber, and low calorie. Greek barkley salad has enough extra ingredients to bring it adequate punch to satisfy your taste buds over lunch!

Seared asparagus salad

Seared asparagus salad

Seared asparagus salad with Parmigiano crisps is ideal salad for everyone in the mood for romance, and everyone who likes simple yet delicious food. Asparagus is best when grown and picked fresh. Regardless of whether you’re buying thin ‘sprue’ asparagus or extra-large ‘jumbo’ spears, always choose stems that are firm and lush, rather than dry and wrinkly. Avoid any stems that are discoloured, scarred or turning slimy at the tips. If you’re using whole spears, then make sure the buds are tightly furled. If you’re making soup, though, you could also use the cheaper, loose-tipped spears you sometimes find on market stalls. Despite what you may have read or heard, it’s not necessary to buy an asparagus steamer, nor to bind the asparagus into a bundle and cook it upright in a pan. For the best results, wash the stems thoroughly in a sink full of cold water. Then trim the stalks and, if the lower part of the stem seems tough when sliced and eaten raw, lightly peel the bottom third of the stem. Drop loose spears into a pan of boiling water and cook until just tender. The cooking time varies according to the thickness of the stems, but ranges between 3-5 minutes.

Warm mushroom salad

Warm mushroom salad

Warm mushroom salad with toasted walnuts and Stilton cheese is a real pleasure for everyone who loves a rich and delicate food. Hot, buttery mushrooms and baby spinach are tossed with garlic croûtes in this warm salad. The bread can be made ahead and then warmed through and topped with the garlic butter just before serving. Clean the mushrooms with the brush or wipe with damp kitchen paper.  Stilton cheese is made from pasteurised whole cows’ milk, it has a rich, piquant flavour and a moist, crumbly texture. Stilton is at its best between November and April. Blue Stilton should have a ivory-coloured interior with blue-green veining. More mature versions will have a mellow, creamier taste, and will be slightly darker yellow in colour. This is perfect salad that can be a light meal, accompanied by a nice fruity red wine.

Warm potatoes and capers

Warm potatoes and capers

Warm potatoes and capers are excellent served warm as an side dish or appetizer. Cold potatoes are an abdomination, but something quite apecial happens when warm potatoes hit a generous, mustardy dressing. Waxy potatoes have smooth, dense flesh that holds its shape well when cooked. They work well in salads or simply boiled. Key waxy varieties include Charlotte, Maris Peer, and Jersey Royals. Waxy potatoes are available year-round, with new season potatoes available from April to July. Avoid wrinkled, sprouted or discoloured potatoes. Waxy potatoes should be kept in a cool dark place (but not the fridge), preferably in a breathable sack or paper bag. New potatoes should be eaten within three days, whereas older potatoes can be kept for several months in the right conditions. Parboiled waxy potatoes freeze well. This salad should be eaten warm, obviously.