Category Archives: DISHES

Broccoli souffles

Broccoli souffles

Broccoli souffles is an elegant dish that is made with broccoli, shallots, and blue cheese combined with soufflé mixture and flavoured with nutmeg and cayenne pepper. A soufflé is a lightly baked cake made with egg yolks and beaten egg whites combined with various other ingredients and served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to blow up” or more loosely “puff up”—an apt description of what happens to this combination of custard and egg whites. Soufflés can be made in containers of all shapes and sizes but it is traditional to make soufflé in ramekins. These containers vary greatly in size, but are typically glazed white, flat-bottomed, round porcelain containers with unglazed bottoms and fluted exterior borders. When it comes out of the oven, a soufflé should be puffed up and fluffy, and it will generally fall after 5 or 10 minutes (as risen dough does).

Kedgeree

Kedgeree

Kedgeree is Anglo-Indian breakfast dish made with long grain rice baked with smoked haddock, hard boiled eggs, cream and lemon juice. It is widely believed that the dish was brought to the United Kingdom by returning British colonials who had enjoyed it in India and introduced it to the UK as a breakfast dish in Victorian times, part of the then fashionable Anglo-Indian cuisine. It is one of many breakfast dishes that, in the days before refrigeration, converted yesterday’s leftovers into hearty and appealing breakfast dishes, of which bubble and squeak is probably the best known. The dish can be eaten hot or cold. Other fish can be used instead of haddock such as tuna or salmon, though that is not traditional. Some kedgeree recipes include ingredients such as sultanas, curry powder, onion, coriander, fresh ginger etc.

Croque senor

Croque senor

Croque senor is actually sandwich of Cheddar cheese and ham given a Mexican flavour with salsa of tomatoes, chilli and red pepper. It is a version of the croque-monsieur, that originated in French cafés and bars as a quick snack. Typically, Emmental or Gruyère cheese is used. The name is based on the verb croquer (“to crunch”) and the word monsieur (“mister”). The sandwich’s first recorded appearance on a Parisian café menu was in 1910. A ham and cheese sandwich snack, very similar to the croque-monsieur though not containing any béchamel, is called a tosti in the Netherlands, and toast (pronounced “tost”) in Italy and Greece. Similarly, in England a ham and cheese hot snack is called a ‘toastie’, and toastie makers are available to buy. In the United States, the Monte Cristo, a ham-and-cheese sandwich often dipped in egg and fried, is popular diner fare. A version of this sandwich in Spain replaces the ham with sobrassada, a soft sausage from the Balearic Islands that can be easily spread. In Catalonia it is known as a bikini.

Jerk chicken

Jerk chicken

Native to Jamaica, the tradition of jerk chicken (or pork) began with the indigenous Taíno people who would cook their meat over fires made from the aromatic wood of the island’s allspice trees – still the only way, devotees claim, to get that really authentic flavour. Jerk’s distinctive seasoning – hot peppers, sweet allspice berries, thyme and ginger – however, is credited to the African slaves brought to the island by its Spanish and British colonisers, who also introduced the cooking pits which were traditionally used for jerk until the advent of the modern oil drum. The name, apparently, is the Spanish version of an Andean dialect word for dried meat, ch’arki – presumably because the original jerk would have been smoked to preserve it. To get more authentic jerk experience, add some wood chips to your barbecue and cook your chicken thight or legs over slow indirect heat for the best flavour. Alternatively enjoy a beautiful jerk chicken breast cooked over a high heat – it should be ready in 10 minutes or less.

Saag aloo

Saag aloo

Saag aloo  is a North Indian dish made from spinach (saag) and potato (aloo) that has a uniquely delicious taste. It is perhaps one of the most popular Indian side dishes in the UK. It is ideal eaten with rice, lentil dal and another vegetable, meat or fish main course. You can also serve your saag aloo with the plain naan bread. Seasoned with black mustard seeds, grated ginger and turmeric, this dish will have your taste buds dancing all over the place. Double your portions and make a large batch of this delicious recipe as a vegetarian curry for 4 or more people. Saag aloo is basically fried potatoes dipped in spinach curry, and can be made with both spinach and mustard leaves, although spinach is more common. Saag aloo is commonly served hot, and topped with ghee (clarified butter).