Category Archives: MAIN COURSE

Roast duck breasts with parsnip purée

Roast duck breasts with parsnip purée

Roast Duck Breasts with Parsnip Purée  is a classic dish. The duck breasts used for this recipe are called magrets. This is a duck breast that has been completely removed from the bone and has no wing attached. This breast can then have the skin removed or left on. Leaving the skin on gives a crispy finish. The magret refers to the breast of a Moulard duck that has been reared for foie gras. A Moulard duck is a cross between a Muscovy drake and a Pekin hen, and is a sizable bird with a well-developed breast. It also is the preferred duck used to produce foie gras, because of its large size and hearty constitution.  Magret duck breasts usually come vacuum-packed from France and are ready to cook. If you can’t get magrets, simply roast duck breasts still on the carcass, then remove them from the bone once cooked and rested. 

Spanish pork and vegetable stew

Spanish pork and vegetable stew

Spanish pork and vegetable stew is a perfect dish for the autumn weather that coming. Perfect on the cold night with a big glass of Rioja, this rustic and comforting stew is a variation on the style popular in central Spain. Using delicious products local to the area, it is packed full of flavour: smoky chorizo, sweet peppers and rich tomatoes. What is the best, it is perfect dish for evenings with guests or big families. A good, hearty dish for everyone. In this recipe is used jamón, the Spanish ham. In English it refers to certain types of dry-cured ham from Spain. There are two primary types of jamón: jamón serrano (meaning ham from the sierra or mountains) and jamón ibérico (ham from the Black Iberian pig). Any type of ham can be used instead of jamón, so do not worry about it.

Coronation chicken

Coronation chicken

Coronation chicken is an absolute must on any buffet. It is a combination of precooked cold chicken meat, raisins, herbs and spices, and a creamy mayonnaise-based sauce which can be eaten as a salad or used to fill sandwiches.The bright yellow colour of coronation chicken is usually coming from a curry powder or paste, although more sophisticated versions of the recipe are made using fresh herbs and spices and additional ingredients such as flaked almonds, raisins, and crème fraîche. The original dish used curry powder, as fresh curry spices were almost unobtainable in post-war Britain. Coronation chicken may have been inspired by jubilee chicken, a dish prepared for the silver jubilee of George V in 1935, which mixed chicken with mayonnaise and curry. Preparing the food for the banquet of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, Constance Spry, a food writer, and Rosemary Hume, a chef, created the recipe of cold chicken, curry cream sauce and dressing that would later become known as coronation chicken. Additionally, for the Queen’s Golden Jubilee in 2002, another celebratory dish was devised, also called Jubilee chicken.

Pommes Anna

Pommes Anna

Pommes Anna is the recipe that needs firm-fleshed potatoes and butter only. Potatoes are peeled and sliced very thin. The slices, salted and peppered, are layered into a pan, generously doused with butter, and baked/fried until they form a cake. Then they are turned upside down every ten minutes until the outside is golden and crispy. At the end of the cooking period, the dish is unmoulded and forms a cake 6 to 8 inches in diameter and about 2 inches high. The dish is generally credited with having been created during the time of Napoleon III by the chef Adolphe Dugléré, a pupil of Carême, when Dugléré was head chef at the Café Anglais, the leading Paris restaurant of the 19th century, where he reputedly named the dish for one of the grandes cocottes of the period. There is disagreement about which beauty the dish was named after: the actress Dame Judic (real name: Anna Damiens), or Anna DesLions. A mandoline works well for cutting the potatoes into thin, uniform slices, but if you don’t have it cut the potatoes carefully with a sharp knife.

Broccoli souffles

Broccoli souffles

Broccoli souffles is an elegant dish that is made with broccoli, shallots, and blue cheese combined with soufflé mixture and flavoured with nutmeg and cayenne pepper. A soufflé is a lightly baked cake made with egg yolks and beaten egg whites combined with various other ingredients and served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to blow up” or more loosely “puff up”—an apt description of what happens to this combination of custard and egg whites. Soufflés can be made in containers of all shapes and sizes but it is traditional to make soufflé in ramekins. These containers vary greatly in size, but are typically glazed white, flat-bottomed, round porcelain containers with unglazed bottoms and fluted exterior borders. When it comes out of the oven, a soufflé should be puffed up and fluffy, and it will generally fall after 5 or 10 minutes (as risen dough does).