Category Archives: APPETIZERS AND SNACKS

Flatbread with spicy lamb and tomato

Flatbread with spicy lamb and tomato

These flavoursome flatbread with spicy lamb and tomato make an ideal snack or appetizer. The thin crispy base is smeared with a layer of lightly spiced lamb and rolled into a cone with a fresh parsley, sumac and a squeeze of lemon. When buying lamb, choose the leanest cuts with firm, creamy-white fat (although fat colour alone should not be used as a reliable indicator of quality). Avoid cuts with excessive fat or with fat that looks crumbly, brittle and yellowish: this means the meat is old. The colour and flavour of the flesh will vary depending on where the sheep were raised. Look for pale-pink flesh in a very young lamb, to a light- or dark-red colour in an older animal. A good butcher is likely to stock a greater variety of cuts than your local supermarket, or you’ll be able to order exactly what you want.

Toasted ciabatta sandwich with basil vinaigrette

Toasted ciabatta sandwich with basil vinaigrette

This toasted ciabatta sandwich with basil vinaigrette is best after 24 hours of pressing, when the bread has absorbed the juices from the tomatoes but the filling is still fresh. However, the un-toasted sandwich will keep in the fridge for up to three days; the filling components hold up surprisingly well. Feel free to go wild with the filling; goat cheese, grilled sweet peppers, eggplant, and zucchini would all be superb additions.

Poached eggs Florentine

Poached eggs Florentine

Poached eggs Florentine are very interesting recipe. You can serve it as appetizer or even as light diner, with the fresh salad on the side. In this elegant dish, soft poached eggs are served on a bed of wilted spinach and baked in the oven with a creamy, cheese sauce. The term ‘à la Florentine’ means ‘in a style of Florence’ and refers to dishes that are baked in the oven with spinach and topped with rich mornay sauce.

Couscous stuffed tomatoes

Couscous stuffed tomatoes

Couscous stuffed tomatoes look great paired with a salad for a light summer dinner, or you can make a big batch as a side dish for a large crowd. Traditional couscous can be bought in every big supermarket, but needs pre-soaking and takes a long time to cook – it’s usually steamed. Quick-cook couscous is more readily available and more convenient, as it just needs rehydrating in boiled or simmering water. Ready-flavoured couscous can be bought in supermarkets, but you’ll usually get a tastier result by adding your own ingredients to flavour plain couscous during cooking.

Spicy tuna roll

Spicy tuna roll

Spicy tuna rolls is the ideal introduction to Japanese sushi. Contrary to usual opinion, sushi means vinegared rice – it is not a reference to the raw fish. Whoever thought of combining it with raw fish, pickled ginger and wasabi in all of its wonderful varied forms is a genius. Raw meat (usually but not necessarily seafood – in this recipe tuna) sliced and served by itself is sashimi. The black seaweed wrappers used in makimono are called nori. Nori is a type of algae, traditionally cultivated in the harbors of Japan. Originally, algae was scraped from dock pilings, rolled out into thin, edible sheets, and dried in the sun, in a process similar to making rice paper. Today, the commercial product is farmed, processed, toasted, packaged, and sold in sheets.