Category Archives: APPETIZERS AND SNACKS

Crash hot potatoes

Crash hot potatoes

This is one of the easiest and tastiest recipes that everyone must try. It’s what you want when you want a crisp, roast potato, only better. And all you have to do is boil some small potatoes, smash them flat and blast them in a hot oven until they are terminally crisp. Serve with aubergine and lamb, pan-fried fish, grilled sausages, or even on their own, with drinks. It is much healthier option then deep fried chips and gives much more flavour.

The British potato season begins in April with waxy Jersey Royals, which continue into June. Other early potatoes, including waxy salad varieties, start to appear in May. Duke of York (1942) come into season in September and last through to April, but the main potato season begins in October. These potatoes are available until early spring – but beware that, towards the end of storage in March, the starch in potatoes turns to sugar, so chips made from stored varieties will tend to be soggy but sweeter.

Despite this humble tuber’s popularity, shoppers have generally been offered very little choice about what types of potato to choose from. Supermarkets and some farmers’ markets are increasing their range of old and new potato varieties, with myriad tastes and textures. Whichever you buy, they should be firm and well-shaped with no eyes or green patches.

The British tend to prefer white-fleshed tatties, whereas the Dutch and Spanish like yellow-fleshed potatoes, but colour makes little difference to the taste. Once cooked the texture of potatoes can range from smooth, waxy-textured flesh perfect for salads to floury-textured flesh ideal for fluffy mashed potato, so it’s important to know what type of potato you’ve bought before you decide how to cook them.

Garlic prawns

Garlic prawns

Garlic prawns are a diamond coming from Catalan cuisine. As an appetiser for a dinner party, or one of the many tapas you tuck in to over a glass of wine and some good conversation, garlic prawns are sure to be a hit. Serve in cazuelas de barro (earthenware ramekins) for a particularly authentic approach. Cold-water prawns are sold ready-cooked, either peeled or with the shell still on. Warm-water prawns are rarely peeled, but are sold raw and cooked in the shell. Both types of prawns, when sold raw, are likely to have been frozen at some point, even if you buy them chilled: check the label before purchasing if you want to freeze them. If you’re not intending to use the prawns immediately, it’s best to buy them already frozen.

Cheese fondue

Cheese fondue

Cheese fondue is a traditional Swiss dish. Gruyère and Emmental cheeses melted in a fondue pot with wine, garlic, and kirsch. Served with bread and apple for dipping. Contrary to popular view outside of Switzerland, cheese fondue did not originate as an après-ski snack. It’s a hearty peasant dish, using ingredients that were available in the winter: cheese, wine, coarse peasant bread. And since it a traditional dish, it never went ‘out of fashion’ or ‘died out’, as you might think it did if you live in the UK or the US or any place that had the Great Fondue Craze of the ’70s, when a fondue set was a ubiquitous wedding present. In Switzerland, ‘la fondue’ means a cheese fondue and nothing else. Other types of dip-bits-of-food-in-a-communal-pot dishes are specifically called fondue-something, e.g. fondue bourgignonne (bits of beef filet fried in a pot of oil), fondue chinoise (thin slices of beef or other things cooked in a pot of broth), and so on.

Suppli

Suppli

When the rice balls are fried, the outer coating gets crisp and brown, while the rice inside stays creamy with a melted cheese center. When bitten into, the mozzarella pulls out to resemble strands of telephone wires. So the dish got its name supli, suppli al telefono. Suppli are excellent for using up left-over risotto.  Supplì are usually eaten with the fingers: when one is broken in two pieces, the mozzarella becomes drawn out in a string somewhat resembling the cord connecting a telephone handset to the hook. Originally supplì were sold at friggitorie, typical roman shops (nowadays disappeared) where fried food was sold. Now they are commonly served in each pizzeria all around Italy as antipasto.

Bean and quinoa burgers

Bean and quinoa burgers

The key to make the bean and quinoa burgers super tasty is making sure all the spices cover the beans and that everything is well seasoned. This is very healthy and delicious recipe that will be perfect for any occasion. As it is a vegetarian it is suitable for parties with a lots of guests so that everyone could find something.  These burgers may be served with a salad and potatoes  or like a proper burgers with a bread, lettuce, tomatoes, pickles etc. One thing is certain – you will like it!