Category Archives: NON-BAKED DESSERTS

Eton mess

Eton mess

Eton mess is an easy recipe, perfect for summer family gatherings in the garden or nice desert after dinner. It is a traditional English dessert consisting of a mixture of strawberries, pieces of meringue, and cream. It is traditionally served at Eton College’s annual cricket game against the pupils of Harrow School. The word mess may refer to the appearance of the dish, or may be used in the sense of “a quantity of food”, particularly “a prepared dish of soft food” or “a mixture of ingredients cooked or eaten together”. A recent myth is that Eton mess was first created when a meringue dessert was accidentally crushed by a dog while travelling to picnic at Eton College, but what could be salvaged was served as a crushed meringue with strawberries and cream. Classic Eton mess is a quick, crowd-pleasing dessert when made with shop-bought meringue. It’s also a great way to use up broken homemade meringue. Classically Eton mess is made with whipped cream, meringue and strawberries, but you can add anything from a dash of port to a splash of ginger cordial for a twist, or try it with raspberries, bananas and pineapples.

Lemon syllabub

Lemon syllabub

Lemon syllabub is a simple but utterly sublime dessert for any number of occasions. Light and lemony, lemon syllabub marries well with the crunch of baked shortbread. Lemon zest and juice, whipped double cream, sweet white wine, and whisked egg whites, folded together, and topped with lemon zest makes this dessert light and refreshing, a great choice for any taste. A very sharp, acidic citrus fruit with a shiny yellow skin and bitter but zingy flavour. Lemons are rich in vitamin C but have a low sugar content. They’re available year round and used in both sweet and savoury dishes. The aromatic zest or outer rind and juice can be used in marinades, drinks such as lemonade, and a wide variety of desserts. The juice is a good accompaniment to fish and can also be used in place of vinegar as a salad dressing. The zest is often incorporated into stuffings for meat. Whole preserved lemons can be used to flavour stews; they are a common addition to Moroccan dishes.

Raspberries marshmallows

Raspberries marshmallows

Raspberries marshmallows recipe only contained four ingredients and is so easy to make.   When you’re cutting the marshmallows make sure you use a very sharp knife and lots of the cornstarch and powdered sugar mixture. The tartness of the raspberries would be a great counterbalance to the sweet marshmallow. Marshmallows are always fun (especially for children) and they look great served with hot drinks. So, if you never tried to make marshmallows at home now is about the time to give a try. 

White chocolate snowballs

White chocolate snowballs

White chocolate snowballs are lovely, little spherical cakes particularly popular in Winter time, but why not in the Summer, too? they are very simple to make, yet utterly delicious and bursting with creamy, buttery flavours. White chocolate is technically not real chocolate as it doesn’t contain any cocoa solids, but it is made primarily of cocoa butter, sugar and milk solids. White chocolate must contain at least 14% milk solids, including 3.5% milk fat. It retains a popularity all of its own as a vanilla-scented indulgence or as a decorative contrast to dark chocolates.

Mango and lime lassi

Mango and lime lassi

Inspired by the classic Indian drink, this tangy, fruity blend is great for breakfast or as a pick-me-up at any time of the day. Soft, ripe mango blended with yogurt and sharp, zesty lime and lemon juice makes a wonderfully thick, cooling drink that’s packed with energy but that can also be enjoyed as a mellow  soother when you need to unwind. Choose the sweetest, juiciest mango for this exotic drink, which will remind you of warm and wonderful Indian summers. Lassi is a popular, traditional, yogurt-based drink; it originates in India’s Punjab region. Lassi is a blend of yogurt, water, spices, and sometimes, fruit. Sweet lassi, however, contains sugar or fruits, instead of spices. In Dharmic religions, yogurt sweetened with honey is used while performing religious rituals. Less common is lassi served with milk and topped with a thin layer of clotted cream. Mango lassi is gaining popularity worldwide. It is widely available in UK, Malaysia and Singapore, and in many other parts of the world. In various parts of Canada, mango lassi is a cold drink consisting of sweetened kesar mango pulp mixed with yogurt, cream, or ice cream. It is served in a tall glass with a straw, often with ground pistachio nuts sprinkled on top.