Category Archives: CAKES

Tarte Tatin

Tarte Tatin

The tarte Tatin is an upside-down tart in which the fruit (usually apples) are caramelized in butter and sugar before the tart is baked. There are conflicting stories concerning the tart’s origin, but the most common is that Stéphanie Tatin, owner of the Hotel Tatin who also did most of the cooking, was overworked one day. She started to make a traditional apple pie but left the apples cooking in butter and sugar for too long. Smelling the burning, she tried to rescue the dish by putting the pastry base on top of the pan of apples, quickly finishing the cooking by putting the whole pan in the oven. After turning out the upside down tart, she was surprised to find how much the hotel guests appreciated the dessert. In an alternative version of the tart’s origin, Stéphanie baked a caramelized apple tart upside-down by mistake. 

Panforte

Panforte

Panforte literally means ‘strong bread’. An apt description for this dense, fruit loaf that still retains its medieval flavour. Panforte is also known as Siena cake – Siena possibly being the first Italian city to use sugar and spices such as white pepper. Documents from 1205 show that panforte was paid to the monks and nuns of a local monastery as a tax or tithe which was due on the seventh of February that year. There are references to the Crusaders carrying panforte, a durable confection, with them on their quests, and to the use of panforte in surviving sieges. Currently there are many shops in Italy producing panforte, each recipe being their jealously guarded interpretation of the original confection and packaged in distinctive wrapping. Usually a small wedge is served with coffee or a dessert wine after a meal, though some enjoy it with their coffee at breakfast.

Mocha cherry lamingtons

Mocha cherry lamingtons

A lamington is a dessert of Australian origin. It consists of squares of sponge cake coated first in a layer of traditionally chocolate sauce, then in desiccated coconut. Lamingtons are sometimes served as two halves with a layer of cream or strawberry jam between, and are commonly found in South African and Australasian outlets such as cafes, lunch bars, bakeries, home industries and supermarkets. A raspberry variety is also common in New Zealand, while a lemon variety has been encountered in Australia. The chocolate coating is a thin mixture, into which cubes of sponge cake (one cookbook states 4 cm per side) are dipped, and the chocolate is absorbed into the outermost layers of the sponge where it sets. (Similarly, the strawberry jam or chocolate icing is absorbed into the sponge.) The cubes are then covered with coconut and left to set.

Buttermilk pancakes with blueberry and lemon butter

Buttermilk pancakes with blueberry and lemon butter

Buttermilk panecakes are classic breakfast plate, but it is also an ideal dessert for almost any occasion. Breakfasts in America are a particular pleasure especially in the trendier places where you will find dishes like this. Buttermilk makes these pancakes especially tender. Want to know the secret to fluffy buttermilk pancakes? Do not overmix your batter. The batter for your buttermilk pancakes should not be beaten smooth; it should have small to medium lumps. And in the end, your pancakes will be light and fluffy and have lots of flavor. Blueberries are excellent choice, but if you prefer some other fruit just go ahead – strawberries, blackberries, apricots or any other.

Persimmon bars

Persimmon bars

Persimmon bars are delicious and if you have not cook with persimmons earlier it will be a great surprise to you. Persimmons are the edible fruit of a number of species of trees. Like the tomato, persimmons are not popularly considered to be berries, but in terms of botanical morphology the fruit is in fact a berry. Persimmons are eaten fresh, dried, raw, or cooked. When eaten fresh they are usually eaten whole like an apple or cut into quarters, though with some varieties it is best to peel the skin first. One way to consume very ripe persimmons, which can have the texture of pudding, is to remove the top leaf with a paring knife and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. Riper persimmons can also be eaten by removing the top leaf, breaking the fruit in half and eating from the inside out. The flesh ranges from firm to mushy, and the texture is unique. The flesh is very sweet and when firm due to being unripe, possesses an apple-like crunch.