Category Archives: DISHES

Bread sauce

Bread sauce

Bread Sauce is a stalwart of the British kitchen and a classic on the British Christmas table. A bread sauce is a warm or cold sauce thickened with bread. It is a savoury sauce served with a main meal. The sole survivor of the medieval bread-thickened sauces, the traditional British bread sauce is made with milk, butter or cream, and bread crumbs, flavoured with onion, salt, cloves, mace, pepper and bay leaf, with the fat from roasting often added too. It typically accompanies domestic fowl such as turkey or chicken. The use of slightly stale bread is optimal, making it an economical way of using up leftover bread. The sauce is easy to make and uses readily available ingredients. The basic recipe calls for milk and onion with breadcrumbs and butter added as thickeners. Turkish cuisine also features a cold sauce made from breadcrumbs mixed with pounded walnuts or hazelnuts and served with chick pea salads and, most famously, with chicken or duck as Circassian chicken.

Pan haggerty

Pan haggerty

Pan haggerty, the Northumberland version of traditional dish of northeastern England, comprises potatoes, onions and cheese baked in a baking dish, while panackelty, in the Sunderland region, comprises leftover meat cooked slowly with root vegetables. The dish is also sometimes cooked in a frying pan, or made in a large pan and served as a soup, which allows it to be left on the hob and later reheated. This classic dish of layered potato, onions and cheese, slow-cooked in a pan until golden and crispy, will satisfy even the heartiest of appetites. Simple ingredients of potatoes, onion and cheese are budget-friendly and all possible additions, such as bacon, are welcome, but not necessary – the taste of potato in this dish is just gorgeous.

Chicken with Taleggio cheese

Chicken with Taleggio cheese

This is truly scrumptious. It’s also quick to make. Home-made pesto is best, but you can use good-quality pesto from a jar if you’re short of time. Serve with potatoes and salad.The chicken can be prepared up to the end of step 2 up to 12 hours ahead. Freeze at the end of step 2 for up to 2 months.Taleggio cheese is mildly-flavoured whole cows’ milk cheese from northern Italy with a soft texture and a fruity, creamy character. It has a pinkish-brown rind, and a pale-yellow interior which, although elastic, tends to be increasingly crumbly towards the centre of the cheese. Made in square blocks, Taleggio has a pungent aroma that becomes more pronounced as the cheese ages.

Pasta with swordfish, aubergine and mint

Pasta with swordfish, aubergine and mint

Pasta with swordfish, aubergine and mint is very distinctive in taste and quite fulfilling. The swordfish is a firm, succulent and meaty fish whose texture can be compared to that of tuna. Swordfish is a bill fish with a deep iron-grey skin, slim body and long ‘sword’ or bill as the upper jaw. Available as steaks both fresh and frozen, although fresh swordfish is usually better. Swordfish is most often filleted or boned into loins at point of landing; the loins are usually cut into steaks and sold with skin already off, as it needs to be removed prior to cooking. Best char-grilled, pan-fried or barbecued, swordfish stands up well to strong flavours including chilli, ginger, sesame, soy, nam pla and garlic. Although it is an oil-rich species of fish, it benefits from being marinated or brushed generously with oil prior to cooking as this helps prevent it from drying out during cooking.When making this dish you can use busiate (traditional pasta from Trapani area), but this sauce works well with any pasta you have.

Crash hot potatoes

Crash hot potatoes

This is one of the easiest and tastiest recipes that everyone must try. It’s what you want when you want a crisp, roast potato, only better. And all you have to do is boil some small potatoes, smash them flat and blast them in a hot oven until they are terminally crisp. Serve with aubergine and lamb, pan-fried fish, grilled sausages, or even on their own, with drinks. It is much healthier option then deep fried chips and gives much more flavour.

The British potato season begins in April with waxy Jersey Royals, which continue into June. Other early potatoes, including waxy salad varieties, start to appear in May. Duke of York (1942) come into season in September and last through to April, but the main potato season begins in October. These potatoes are available until early spring – but beware that, towards the end of storage in March, the starch in potatoes turns to sugar, so chips made from stored varieties will tend to be soggy but sweeter.

Despite this humble tuber’s popularity, shoppers have generally been offered very little choice about what types of potato to choose from. Supermarkets and some farmers’ markets are increasing their range of old and new potato varieties, with myriad tastes and textures. Whichever you buy, they should be firm and well-shaped with no eyes or green patches.

The British tend to prefer white-fleshed tatties, whereas the Dutch and Spanish like yellow-fleshed potatoes, but colour makes little difference to the taste. Once cooked the texture of potatoes can range from smooth, waxy-textured flesh perfect for salads to floury-textured flesh ideal for fluffy mashed potato, so it’s important to know what type of potato you’ve bought before you decide how to cook them.