Category Archives: MAIN COURSE

Grilled vegetable strudel with Roquefort cheese

Grilled vegetable strudel with Roquefort cheese

Grilled vegetable strudel with Roquefort cheese is an ideal dish for vegetarians. It has a strong taste since you have to choose a strong cheese – if you don’t have Roquefort, use Stilton cheese for example. Roquefort cheese is a sheep milk blue cheese from the south of France, and together with Bleu d’Auvergne, Stilton and Gorgonzola is one of the world’s best known blue-cheeses.  Legend has it that the cheese was discovered when a youth, eating his lunch of bread and ewes’ milk cheese, saw a beautiful girl in the distance. Abandoning his meal in a nearby cave, he ran to meet her. When he returned a few months later, the mold (Penicillium roqueforti) had transformed his plain cheese into Roquefort.

Christmas roast turkey

Christmas roast turkey

What would be the Christmas without the nice and crispy roast turkey? It is the central dish on your Christmas table, a favourite family recipe, served every Christmas for a very long time.  In this recipe slipping lemon slices and fresh thyme under the skin will give you a succulent bird with a delicious aroma. Be sure you start all preparations on time. Take the turkey out of the fridge early in the morning on Christmas day, about 7.40 am, because it will be done about 1.20 pm.

Stuffed aubergines

Stuffed aubergines

Stuffed aubergines is a wonderful dish is all about aubergine stuffed with breadcrumbs, cheese and herbs, served in equally delicious tomato sauce. Although it sounds very much like a midsummer dish, served hot with perhaps a little pasta on the side, it does make a hearty meal even if it is a cold, rainy day. Originally,  you’d have to use dry Corsican cheese in it, but the parmesan cheese works just a well. You can make a fairly herby tomato sauce, but any regular one would work here too.

Blanquette of lamb

Blanquette of lamb

Blanquette is  the French term for a ragout of white meat (veal, lamb or poultry)cooked in a white stock or water with aromatic flavorings. Theoretically, the sauce is obtained by making a roux and adding cream and egg yolks. However, the roux is more often than not omitted. Blanquette had a very important place in historical cuisine and became a classic of bourgeois cookery. Blanquettes are also made with fish (monkfish) and vegetables (chard and celery). Blanquette is usually served with rice a la creole but may also be served with celeriac (celery root), halved celery hearts, carrots, braised parsnips or leeks, cucumber (cut into chunks and braised three minutes in boiling salted water, braised lettuce or lettuce hearts. Because this is a classic “white stew” there is a prejudice to serving it with any items that would add color (i.e. carrots or peas).

Beef Wellington

Beef Wellington

Beef Wellington is the classic which you can find on the menu of many fine restaurants. Inside a puff pastry case is a succulent piece of prime beef and a rich stuffing of liver pâté and mushrooms. The pastry locks in all juices and ensures none of the wonderful flavours are lost. Serve with a mushroom and red wine gravy. A whole tenderloin may be wrapped and baked, and then sliced for serving, or the tenderloin may be sliced into individual portions prior to wrapping and baking. Many spices may be added to enhance the flavour; some examples are curry, allspice, any grilling mix or ginger. The origin of the name is unclear. There are theories that suggest that beef Wellington is named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. Some theories go a step further and suggest this was due to his love of a dish of beef, truffles, mushrooms, Madeira wine, and pâté cooked in pastry, but there is a noted lack of evidence supporting this.