Category Archives: MAIN COURSE

Matar paneer

Matar paneer

Matar paneer is a popular North Indian dish. Paneer is a firm Indian cheese, made by curdling hot milk with lemon juice or vinegar, then straining through muslin, rinsing off in water and pressing into rectangular blocks. It has the unusual properties of being suitable for frying and it does not melt when cooked, but stays in soft, neat little chunks. The use of paneer is more common in Nepal, India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh due to the prominence of milk in their cuisine. It is sometimes wrapped in dough and deep-fried or served with either spinach (palak paneer) or peas (mattar paneer). Matar paneer is usually served with naan, roti, chapati and paratha but goes very well with rice and pulao also. The mild flavors of the paneer (cottage cheese) marry beautifully with the delicious sauce in this recipe.

Vitello tonnato

Vitello tonnato

There are two versions of vitello tonnato, North Italian dish, both featuring a sauce of mashed tuna and anchovies. In the older, Milanese, version the sauce is thinned the cream; this recipe is for the Piemontese dish, which uses mayonnaise rather than cream. Vitello tonnato is a cold dish. It is served chilled or at room temperature, generally in the summertime, as the main course of an Italian meal or as “an exceedingly elegant antipasto for an elaborate dinner. The dish is allowed to refrigerate for a period up to 5 days to fully develop the flavor. This dish is also the traditional centerpiece of the Ferragosto dinner in Milano (Assumption Day, August 15th).

Risotto nero

Risotto nero

You can sometimes buy the ink of the squid from your fishmonger, although most are lost or burst by the time the squid reaches the shop. The little sachets of ink are more easily found. Squid ink qualifies as seafood, so don’t serve this risotto with parmesan.The ink make risotto looks very much like gravelly tar. However, it’s extremely delicate, with much of the delicacy coming from the ink, which imparts an evenness to the cuttlefish flavor of the risotto that would have been absent otherwise. You could also make this with squid or calamari. The deep, murky aroma and flavor of squid ink is unmistakable, and risotto nero is a classic Italian recipe which highlights that flavor.

Piperade

Piperade

Piperade is a traditional Basque dish , a delicious melding of ratatouille and eggs. The name is derived from ‘piper’, meaning red capsicum in the local dialect. The eggs can either be cooked more like an omelette or scrambled as done here. The colours coincidentally reflect the colours of the spectrum like Basque flag (red, green and white). Piperade, a spicy tomato-pepper sauce from the Basque region of France can be as a stewing ingredient or a garnish to a finished dish. It may be served as a main course or as a side dish. Typical additions include egg, garlic or meats such as ham. This is a traditional French dish and is served in restaurants and cafés throughout France.

Bobotie

Bobotie

Bobotie is a Cape Town specialty and one of South Africa’s best-known dishes, it generally consists of spiced meat—normally beef, sometimes lamb—mixed with chutney and tamarind paste and milk-soaked bread, poured into a dish, topped with a custard of egg and milk, and baked until it’s golden on top. The dish’s origins go back to the mid-17th century, when the first Malay slaves were brought to the Cape of Good Hope, and with them, their cooking. At the same time Dutch colonizers brought a taste for sweet things—hence the golden raisins mixed in with the meat; Indian immigrants, who began arriving in the late 19th century, contributed warming curry spices, giving rise to the classically Cape Malay balancing act between sour, spicy, sweet, and savory flavors that makes bobotie so satisfying. Often almonds are part of the recipe, and even bananas, but there are limits to what you can do and still call it bobotie.