Category Archives: MAIN COURSE

Irish Skillet

Irish Skillet

A touch of bacon and a splash of apple juice enhance the savory flavors in this traditional beef, potato and cabbage dish. Enjoy this easy skillet dinner on nights when there’s no time to cook. Serve immediately while hot with some Irish soda bread.

Meal is ready for 30 minutes!

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 package Simply Potatoes® Shredded Hash Browns
2 slices uncooked bacon, cut into small pieces
1 pound lean ground beef

Lamb “Couscous”

Lamb “Couscous”

Couscous is a dish made from tiny granules of durum wheat. The couscous grains are then prepared by steaming them until they have a light, fluffy consistency. Couscous is one of the staple foods of the Maghrib (western North Africa). Couscous is made from two different sizes of the husked and crushed, but unground, semolina of hard wheat using water to bind them. The key to preparing an authentic couscous is patience and care. Couscous is cooked in a special kind of cooking ensemble called a kiskis, known by the French word couscousiere in the West, except in Italy, where it is called a couscousiera. A kiskis consists of two parts: the bottom portion is a pot-bellied vessel for the broth while the top part fits snugly over the bottom part and has holes in its bottom for the steam to rise through, which cooks the couscous. In North Africa, they are often made of earthenware or aluminum.

Preparing instant couscous is quick and easy — the dried couscous is added to a pot of boiling water or stock, the pot is then covered and the water is absorbed into the couscous in about five minutes.

Spicy Spring Lamb

Spicy Spring Lamb

Lamb is meat from sheep less than 1 year old. If fresh local lamb is available, you will find no better. Spring lamb season runs from May-October but the earlier spring months are when British lamb is at its most succulent and its flavour at its most subtle (partly down to their impressive consumption of fresh grass).

If you prefer your lamb to be more flavourful and robust, embrace what’s on offer in the later months, around late summer and autumnIf the phrase “Spring Lamb” is on a meat label, it means the lamb was produced between March and October, but lamb is available all the time.

Seafood and chicken paella

Seafood and chicken paella

Paella is an internationally-known rice dish from Spain. It originated in the fields of a region called Valencia in eastern Spain. The legend says that, at lunch time, workers in the fields would make the rice dish in a flat pan over a fire. They mixed in whatever they could find – such as snails and vegetables. For special occasions, rabbit and later chicken were added.

Today paella is made in every region of Spain, using just about any kind of ingredient that goes well with rice. There are as many versions of paella as there are cooks. It may contain chicken, pork, shellfish, fish, eel, squid, beans, peas, artichokes or peppers. Saffron, the spice that also turns the rice a wonderful golden color is an essential part of the dish.

Ragoût of pork with prunes

Ragoût of pork with prunes
Ragoût is a thick, rich, highly-seasoned stew of meat, poultry or fish that can be made with or without vegetables. The basic method of preparation ragoût involves slow cooking over a low heat.

Pork and prunes are a classic combination that unite in this braise that’s both easy to prepare and easy on your wallet. When coupled together in this recipe the oozing flavors create a delightful dish that the whole family can enjoy. Pork shoulder is an inexpensive and juicy cut of meat that works well in a variety of dishes.