Category Archives: DESSERTS

Eton mess

Eton mess

Eton mess is an easy recipe, perfect for summer family gatherings in the garden or nice desert after dinner. It is a traditional English dessert consisting of a mixture of strawberries, pieces of meringue, and cream. It is traditionally served at Eton College’s annual cricket game against the pupils of Harrow School. The word mess may refer to the appearance of the dish, or may be used in the sense of “a quantity of food”, particularly “a prepared dish of soft food” or “a mixture of ingredients cooked or eaten together”. A recent myth is that Eton mess was first created when a meringue dessert was accidentally crushed by a dog while travelling to picnic at Eton College, but what could be salvaged was served as a crushed meringue with strawberries and cream. Classic Eton mess is a quick, crowd-pleasing dessert when made with shop-bought meringue. It’s also a great way to use up broken homemade meringue. Classically Eton mess is made with whipped cream, meringue and strawberries, but you can add anything from a dash of port to a splash of ginger cordial for a twist, or try it with raspberries, bananas and pineapples.

Queen of puddings

Queen of puddings

Queen of Puddings is old-fashioned favourite: smooth set creamy custard is flavoured with orange zest, spread with melted jam, and topped with meringue. This is a traditional British dessert, and similar recipes are called Monmouth Pudding and Manchester Pudding. A Monmouth Pudding is said to consist of layers of meringue, jam or seasonal fruit and bread soaked in milk, whilst Manchester Pudding is similar but contains egg yolks (but some have speculated that this name was just a synonym for the Queen of Puddings). As befits such a treat, it is a little more technical than most of the recipes to date, but there is nothing here that requires great skill. It is simply a question of following the steps carefully to produce a brilliantly showy pudding. Queen of Puddings is so worthy of its name, a pudding filled with lovely ingredients and crowned with a layer of soft chewy meringue.

Pistachio kulfi

Pistachio kulfi

Pistachio kulfi is an Indian classic dessert.  Kulfi is a popular frozen dairy dessert from the Indian Subcontinent. It is often described as “traditional Indian Subcontinent ice cream”. It is popular throughout places such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Burma (Myanmar), and the Middle East, and widely available in Indian restaurants in Australia, Europe, East Asia and North America. Kulfi is traditionally prepared by evaporating sweetened and flavoured milk via slow cooking, with almost continuous stirring to keep milk from sticking to the bottom of the vessel where it might burn, until its volume was reduced by a half, thus thickening it, increasing its fat, protein, and lactose density. It has a distinctive taste due to caramelization of lactose and sugar during the lengthy cooking process. Traditionally in India, kulfi is sold by vendors called kulfiwalas, who keep the kulfi frozen by placing the moulds inside a large earthenware pot called a matka, filled with ice and salt. It is served on a leaf or frozen onto a stick. It can be garnished with pistachios, cardamom, and similar items. Often it is served as falooda kulfi, which is kulfi with rice noodles, rose, or any flavour sugar syrup and other ingredients. Popular flavours include pistachio, mango, vanilla, and rose.

Iced Christmas pudding

Iced Christmas pudding

Traditionally, sweet treats for the Christmas season are various puddings, pies, trifle and cheesecake. This is the recipe for a slightly different Christmas pudding. It is made from basic ingredients, but is delicious and looks good. And it is very easy to make – just combine dried fruit, apricots, cherries, and brandy with custard and whipped cream and froze. Dried fruit is used by regular cake-makers and steamed pudding fans. It can also be added to mincemeat. However, most recipes benefit from controlling the proportions of the different dried fruits. It is a real treat that is, with its look, an excellent choice for cold, snowy Christmas Eve.

Lemon syllabub

Lemon syllabub

Lemon syllabub is a simple but utterly sublime dessert for any number of occasions. Light and lemony, lemon syllabub marries well with the crunch of baked shortbread. Lemon zest and juice, whipped double cream, sweet white wine, and whisked egg whites, folded together, and topped with lemon zest makes this dessert light and refreshing, a great choice for any taste. A very sharp, acidic citrus fruit with a shiny yellow skin and bitter but zingy flavour. Lemons are rich in vitamin C but have a low sugar content. They’re available year round and used in both sweet and savoury dishes. The aromatic zest or outer rind and juice can be used in marinades, drinks such as lemonade, and a wide variety of desserts. The juice is a good accompaniment to fish and can also be used in place of vinegar as a salad dressing. The zest is often incorporated into stuffings for meat. Whole preserved lemons can be used to flavour stews; they are a common addition to Moroccan dishes.