Category Archives: BAKERY

Mushrooms in puff pastry

Mushrooms in puff pastry

Mushrooms in puff pastry are easy making appetizer or breakfast pastry. In raw form, puff pastry is a dough which is spread with solid fat and repeatedly folded and rolled out (never mashed, as this will destroy layering) and used to produce the aforementioned pastries. It is sometimes called a “water dough” or détrempe. Commercially made puff pastry is available in grocery stores. Common types of fat used include butter, vegetable shortenings, and lard. Butter is the most common type used because it provides a richer taste and superior mouthfeel.

Gruyère and chive muffins

Gruyère and chive muffins

Those Gruyère and chive muffins are eggy, cheesy, and piping hot, Barclay Prime’s Gruyère and chive popovers were softball-sized and begging for a slathering of butter. I tore off a crunchy corner and a wisp of steam escaped, exposing an airy interior and an aroma of melted Gruyère cheese. This famous Alpine cheese, which originated in Switzerland but is also now produced in France, has a firm, pliable texture and a nutty, slightly sweet flavour, and is popularly used in dishes such as fondues and gratins. It is made in large rounds which, if left uncut, will keep extremely well for over a year. The ivory or pale-yellow interior has fewer (and smaller) holes than Switzerland’s best-known cheese, Emmental. Neither should Gruyère be confused with other cooked, pressed Alpine cheeses such as Comté and Beaufort.

Cranberry and sweet potato bread

Cranberry and sweet potato bread

Cranberry and sweet potato bread is delicious year-round, but it’s best served at Christmas and winter period because of the cranberries. One of the remarkable properties of fresh cranberries is their ability to keep for months on end in a cool place. This is because they contain large amounts of benzoic acid, which is a natural preservative. The bulk of the world’s cranberries are now cultivated, mainly in certain parts of Canada and North America, but cranberries can still occasionally be found growing wild. Sweet potatoes have a slightly sweet flavour (as their name suggests). Sweet potatoes can be cooked in similar ways to the potato but cook much more quickly. Wrap a freshly baked loaf in cellophane and tie with a pretty ribbon for a lovely homemade gift. Also it it a great for picnics, lunch boxes for school children or healthy lunch in the office.

Soda bread

Soda bread

Soda bread, for those who aren’t familiar with it, gets its name from the fact that baking soda is used as the leavening agent instead of yeast. The ingredients of traditional soda bread are flour, bread soda, salt, and buttermilk. The buttermilk in the dough contains lactic acid, which reacts with the baking soda to form tiny bubbles of carbon dioxide. Other ingredients can be added such as butter, egg, raisins or nuts. In Europe, soda breads began to appear in the mid-19th century when bicarbonate of soda first became available for use as a rising agent. Breads, griddle cakes and scones with bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar or tartaric acid became popular in Austria, Polish cuisine and in the British Isles. Traditional soda bread, eaten in Serbian cuisine, also uses bicarbonate of soda, particularly the traditional česnica (Serbian Cyrillic: Чесница), a soda bread made at Christmas.

Spinach tart

Spinach tart

This spinach tart is a bit different yet still a great choice for any occasion. A lot of people are put off spinach as kids, partly because it is a bit strong for some children’s palates, partly because it is often murdered in the kitchen, and partly because the adults go on about how healthy it is. If this applies to you, think again. Popeye was right—spinach is good for you, being rich in iron, Vitamin A, and antioxidants—but it is also one of the tastiest vegetables around. It goes particularly well with cheese, as in this scrumptious tart.