Category Archives: BAKERY

Turnip Souffle

Turnip Souffle

Turnips originated in Europe and have been eaten in France since there was a France, unlike the potato, who is a relative newcomer on our dining tables. They are sort of a forgotten vegetable these days.

Turnips have lots of Vitamin C as well as being good sources of many other vitamins and minerals, including calcium. And don’t forget that they are very low in calories and great sources of fiber. They are reputed to help fight against cancer. On the downside, they can be difficult to digest for some people (like their cousins, rutabaga and cabbage).

Coconut muffins

Coconut muffins

The coconut sold today is usually the de-husked, hard, brown ‘stone’ of a ripe coconut. This brown shell has three eyes at one end. The coconut is inside a further thin, brown, coat called the testa: the creamy-white, firm flesh of the coconut is attached to this. The middle of a coconut is hollow and filled with a sweet liquid known as coconut juice or coconut water. The testa of a coconut hardens as the coconut ripens. Occasionally, young, unripe, green coconuts are sold as ‘jelly’ coconuts: their white flesh is still soft and jelly-like with a slightly more ‘milky’ water (this liquid is not coconut milk or coconut cream).

Pumpernickel

Pumpernickel

Pumpernickel is a dark rye loaf packed with flavour and made with chocolate or cocoa powder and treacle. It makes the perfect accompaniment to many dips or makes a delicious open sandwich spread with cream cheese. Pumpernickel bread is a form of German bread, referenced at least as far back as the 1450s. It is characterized by its dark color, virtually no crust and its rye taste. While it is fairly easy to find American style pumpernickel bread in the US, finding the traditional German style can be quite difficult. There are a few bakers who master the style and sell their pumpernickel bread at their bakeries or at specialty food stores. You may be able to order the true German pumpernickel bread on the Internet.

Choux pastry

Choux pastry

Choux pastry is the lightest, crispiest, airiest pastry, which can be used to make profiteroles, éclairs or savoury gougères. It puffs up in the oven until it is eventually set by the heat. Choux pastry has a high water content. The water in the mixture creates steam during cooking which forces the pastry to expand in volume, leaving it with a hollow centre and a light texture. What is really good about choux is that it doesn’t call for any particular pastry skills, like lightness of hand or careful rolling. I never pipe choux because I am convinced that a freshly baked golden profiterole looks so much crustier if it is spooned, rather than piped, on to a baking sheet.

German pretzel sticks

German pretzel sticks
A bread pretzel popular in southern Germany and adjoining German-speaking areas, as well as in some areas of the United States, is made from wheat flour, water and yeast, usually sprinkled with coarse salt, hand-sized and made for consumption on the same day. It is relatively soft, rather than brittle. Pretzels in stick form may also be called pretzels in the English-speaking context. For seasoning and decoration various glazes, salt crystals, sugar and various seeds or nuts can be used. The size varies from large enough for one to be a sufficient serving, to much smaller.