Category Archives: BREADS

Pão de Queijo

Pão de Queijo

Pão de queijo (cheese buns) are a lot like gougères, but with a little less fat and zero gluten. Why’s that? Because they’re made from tapioca starch, a derivative of the cassava root, not wheat flour. This gives them a somewhat different texture, like a soft wheat bun when cool, like a hot air balloon made of molten cheese when warm. It is a popular snack and breakfast food in Bolivia, Brazil (specially in the state of Minas Gerais), Paraguay and northern Argentina. In countries where the snack is popular, it is inexpensive and often sold from streetside stands by vendors carrying a heat-preserving container. One can knead pão de queijo in a mixer with a hook attachment or do it manually by hand. Once the mixture reaches a doughy consistency, it’s vital to roll it into a ball and either bake immediately or freeze it for later use. If left to rest, the dough will virtually liquify.

Boule bread

Boule bread

Boule, from the French for “ball”, is a traditional shape of French bread, resembling a squashed ball. It is a rustic loaf shape that can be made of any type of flour. A boule can be leavened with commercial yeast, chemical leavening, or even wild yeast sourdough. There are so many different techniques and methods when it comes to making bread – none of them are wrong, but just different to one another. Firstly, it may seem unusual to use a combination of bread flour and normal plain flour. However, I find that a little bit of ordinary plain flour tenderises the dough and makes a much more soft and fluffy dough inside.

Milk rolls

Milk rolls

These milk rolls recipe is very easy and simple. The softness of these tender buns brings in many compliments. Served warm with butter or jam, they’re a big hit at any meal. They re-heat nicely, too. They are easy to make, you can shape them in various ways (buns, knots, twists, plaits or any other possible you can imagine). before baking, you can sprinkle them with sesame seeds, poppy seeds, cumin seeds or even the grated cheese.  Or you can leave it simple.

Cranberry and sweet potato bread

Cranberry and sweet potato bread

Cranberry and sweet potato bread is delicious year-round, but it’s best served at Christmas and winter period because of the cranberries. One of the remarkable properties of fresh cranberries is their ability to keep for months on end in a cool place. This is because they contain large amounts of benzoic acid, which is a natural preservative. The bulk of the world’s cranberries are now cultivated, mainly in certain parts of Canada and North America, but cranberries can still occasionally be found growing wild. Sweet potatoes have a slightly sweet flavour (as their name suggests). Sweet potatoes can be cooked in similar ways to the potato but cook much more quickly. Wrap a freshly baked loaf in cellophane and tie with a pretty ribbon for a lovely homemade gift. Also it it a great for picnics, lunch boxes for school children or healthy lunch in the office.

Soda bread

Soda bread

Soda bread, for those who aren’t familiar with it, gets its name from the fact that baking soda is used as the leavening agent instead of yeast. The ingredients of traditional soda bread are flour, bread soda, salt, and buttermilk. The buttermilk in the dough contains lactic acid, which reacts with the baking soda to form tiny bubbles of carbon dioxide. Other ingredients can be added such as butter, egg, raisins or nuts. In Europe, soda breads began to appear in the mid-19th century when bicarbonate of soda first became available for use as a rising agent. Breads, griddle cakes and scones with bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar or tartaric acid became popular in Austria, Polish cuisine and in the British Isles. Traditional soda bread, eaten in Serbian cuisine, also uses bicarbonate of soda, particularly the traditional česnica (Serbian Cyrillic: Чесница), a soda bread made at Christmas.