Category Archives: BAKERY

Cranberry cupcake

Cranberry cupcake

 

Cranberry cupcake is an easy and quick recipe and can be made all year around as you can use frozen fruit. Cranberries are the deep-red, tart fruit of a low, scrubby, woody bog plant. They are a winter berry that has become synonymous with the Christmas table for many. The bulk of the world’s cranberries are now cultivated, mainly in certain parts of Canada and North America, but cranberries can still occasionally be found growing wild. One of the remarkable properties of fresh cranberries is their ability to keep for months on end in a cool place. This is because they contain large amounts of benzoic acid, which is a natural preservative.

Greek olive bread

Greek olive bread

The flavours of the Mediterranean simply ooze from this decorative Greek olive bread, speckled with black olives, red onion and herbs. Originally this bread was a Lenten food for the priests of the Eastern Orthodox Church, although now olive bread or elioti is produced all over the country and can be enjoyed at any time of the year. It is generally a white bread, enriched with a little olive oil, flavoured with marjoram or oregano and studded with black olives. Throughout Greece, local bakers produce their own particular bread, which necessarily becomes a favourite with their customers. In the cities, the more enterprising bakeries produce a wide range of breads flavoured with raisins, olives and herbs, but among the islands and in the mountains, most loaves continue to be of the plain, farmhouse variety – large and crusty and sometimes sprinkled with sesame seeds.

Skolebrød

Skolebrød
Skolebrød (literally “School Bread”) are sweet buns filled with custard and topped with icing sugar and desiccated coconut. They are super popular and can be found all over Norway. Traditionally, they would feature in kids’ school lunch boxes as a special treat or for the annoying swots to give to the teacher, so the story goes. Nowadays, Skolebrød is fairly ubiquitous and can be found in coffee shops, snack bars or when invited to someone’s house for coffee (never tea in Norway, just lots and lots of strong black coffee). Be careful though as they are very addictive, and one is never enough. Filled with rich vanilla cream or vanilla pudding, Norwegian School Bread is a special treat to include in your children’s lunches or to prepare for a special school gathering.

Apricot and plum brioche

Apricot and plum brioche

Apricot and plum brioche is real summer recipe. Both apricots and plums are seasonal fruits and it is easy to find very nice varieties. Apricots are at their best and cheapest in July, but avoid any fruit that feels spongy. Apricots can vary greatly in quality. If they taste woolly and bland when eaten fresh, cook them into a dish and they will become luscious and flavoursome. The British plum season starts in late July with the Opal variety and finishes in mid-to late-September with the Marjorie Seedling. Each variety has a 2-3 week season. Plums develop an intense flavour when cooked. They make excellent jam, jelly and fruit cheese, but can also be bottled. Strong spices such as star anise, cloves, vanilla, cinnamon and black pepper all taste good with poached plums. Cream and custard based accompaniments such as ice cream or rice pudding balance their flavour. Out-of-season imported plums can be cooked, but are much sweeter and taste best eaten raw.

Crumpets

Crumpets

Crumpets – golden and fresh from the griddle, a simple batter cooked until light and tender. In early times, they were hard pancakes cooked on a griddle, rather than the soft and spongy crumpets of the Victorian era, which were made with yeast. The crumpet-makers of the English Midlands and London developed the characteristic holes by adding extra baking powder to the yeast dough. The term itself may refer to a crumpled or curled-up cake, or have Celtic origins relating to the Breton krampoez meaning a “thin, flat cake” and the Welsh crempog or crempot, a type of pancake. They have a characteristic flat top with many small pores and a chewy and spongy texture. They may be cooked until ready to eat warm from the pan, but are frequently left slightly undercooked so that they may be cooled and stored before being eaten freshly toasted.